30 Amp 125/250 outlet

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#1
I visit my parents every week and I noticed they have a 30amp 125/250 outlet.

I typed that into the web and it shows Home Depot sells a plug made for Tesla charging.

Is anyone familiar with this? Which one is recommended and how much charge will it provide?

Thanks as I am new to model 3 and to posting on a forum
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JWardell

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#3
For some reason, Tesla has been sold out of the 10-30 adapter for weeks or months.
10-30 is the slightly older standard for dryer outlets, 14-30 is more likely in modern houses.
You can use a 10-30 to 14-50 adapter *IF* you first turn down your charge current to 24 Amp.
Better yet, if you're sure it's not used for anything else anymore you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
 
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#4
Whoa! That’s over my head. I suppose
For some reason, Tesla has been sold out of the 10-30 adapter for weeks or months.
10-30 is the slightly older standard for dryer outlets, 14-30 is more likely in modern houses.
You can use a 10-30 to 14-50 adapter *IF* you first turn down your charge current to 24 Amp.
Better yet, if you're sure it's not used for anything else anymore you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
Whoa! That’s very descriptive but way over my head!I suppose I should have an electrician look at this.
 
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#5

Thank you. I believe it is the 5th

The 10-30 appears to be sold out. I can try to find it on amazon. Is that the correct one? The image doesn’t show the Product number or name.
 
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#6
you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
In order to change the existing NEMA 10-30 receptacle to a NEMA 14-30, you will need to add/pull a ground wire or run 10/3 + grnd.

I would also vacuum out the dirt particulates in the receptacle or possibly replacing it with a fresh new one after the power is turned off and verified.

You may consider purchasing a MC 10-30 adapter from quickchargepower.com.
Good-luck!
 
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ADK46

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#7
In order to change the existing NEMA 10-30 receptacle to a NEMA 14-30, you will need to add/pull a ground wire or run 10/3 + grnd. ...
I believe the needed extra wire would normally be a neutral, not a ground. Insulated, white - the difference between a 240V and a 240/120V outlet.

(In older wiring there were some exceptions, where the neutral and ground could be supplied by the same wire - after all, they are connected to the same thing back in the panel. So, the present third wire to the receptacle may be bare, like a ground wire, or white like a neutral. I wonder what these adaptors do with the connection of this potentially ambiguous wire.)
 
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#8
I believe the needed extra wire would normally be a neutral, not a ground. Insulated, white - the difference between a 240V and a 240/120V outlet.

(In older wiring there were some exceptions, where the neutral and ground could be supplied by the same wire - after all, they are connected to the same thing back in the panel. So, the present third wire to the receptacle may be bare, like a ground wire, or white like a neutral. I wonder what these adaptors do with the connection of this potentially ambiguous wire.)
NEMA 10-30 is a hot-hot-neutral plug, no ground. That's why its rated 120/240. I can see why Tesla would want out of the ungrounded adapter game. Too high risk.
 

Dr. J

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#9
NEMA 10-30 is a hot-hot-neutral plug, no ground. That's why its rated 120/240. I can see why Tesla would want out of the ungrounded adapter game. Too high risk.
They still sell that adapter for the Gen 1 charger--I bought one just a week ago. Earlier, I bought a Gen 1 charger to use on road trips (because it will charge at 40 amps on a 14-50 campground outlet); I'm currently using it as my home charger until my garage gets built. I also bought a 25' 10-30 extension cord, which was necessary for my current setup and, it turns out, to charge at my Mom's house. Works great.

@Mitchell, I commend you for being an exemplary son (weekly visits to parents). In case it's not clear: a 30-amp circuit should top out at 24 amps (80% of maximum, a standard for safety). If you use anything other than a Tesla 10-30 adapter, the car won't understand it should limit the charge, so you will need to tell it: 24 amps.
 

JML

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#10
TL;DR: I'm 90% sure all the $60 Home Depot 10-30 to 14-50 charging adapter is doing is tying neutral and ground together. For about $12 you can replace the 10-30 receptacle with a 14-30 and tie the neutral and ground together in the plug. Then it will work with the Tesla 14-30 adapter, and you won't have to worry about adjusting the charger current. I'm not a licensed electrician, and I'm not your licensed electrician. If you are not comfortable replacing an outlet, wait for the 10-30 adapter to come into stock, or spend $60 on the 14-50 adapter from Home Depot/Amazon. If your parents have been looking to downsize, burning down their house might be the shove they need to actually do it.

As mentioned, the 10-30 outlet is hot-hot-neutral, and the 14-30 is hot-hot-neutral-ground with neutral and ground connected together in the breaker panel. The 10-30 adapter from Tesla has mostly been sold out since the day I got an unused 10-30 dryer outlet moved to the garage. At the time I got conflicting reports over whether the 10-30 adapter was discontinued or just sold out. The local Tesla store offered to try and get me one overnighted from another store.

The electrician who installed the outlet decided that I did in fact have both a ground and neutral, so I installed a 14-30 in the garage and bought the 14-30 adapter, which avoided the problem of the 10-30 being sold out. It turned out my ground and neutral were not connected in the panel, so the Gen 2 charger refused to charge and gave me a wiring fault code. I disconnected from the ground the electrician had found, and at the plug jumped the neutral and ground together. That made the Gen 2 charger happy.

There is no voltage difference between the car body and the grounded conduit when the car is charging; this passed inspection; neither the outlet, circuit breaker, or capped off old dryer receptacle get hot while charging; and it's going to be the aluminum wiring on half of my 110 circuits that's going to burn down my house (or the Li-ion battery in my $8 drone), not the Tesla; so I'm satisfied that this is safe for charging purposes.
 

Dr. J

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#11
TL;DR: I'm 90% sure all the $60 Home Depot 10-30 to 14-50 charging adapter is doing is tying neutral and ground together. For about $12 you can replace the 10-30 receptacle with a 14-30 and tie the neutral and ground together in the plug. Then it will work with the Tesla 14-30 adapter, and you won't have to worry about adjusting the charger current. I'm not a licensed electrician, and I'm not your licensed electrician. If you are not comfortable replacing an outlet, wait for the 10-30 adapter to come into stock, or spend $60 on the 14-50 adapter from Home Depot/Amazon. If your parents have been looking to downsize, burning down their house might be the shove they need to actually do it.

As mentioned, the 10-30 outlet is hot-hot-neutral, and the 14-30 is hot-hot-neutral-ground with neutral and ground connected together in the breaker panel. The 10-30 adapter from Tesla has mostly been sold out since the day I got an unused 10-30 dryer outlet moved to the garage. At the time I got conflicting reports over whether the 10-30 adapter was discontinued or just sold out. The local Tesla store offered to try and get me one overnighted from another store.

The electrician who installed the outlet decided that I did in fact have both a ground and neutral, so I installed a 14-30 in the garage and bought the 14-30 adapter, which avoided the problem of the 10-30 being sold out. It turned out my ground and neutral were not connected in the panel, so the Gen 2 charger refused to charge and gave me a wiring fault code. I disconnected from the ground the electrician had found, and at the plug jumped the neutral and ground together. That made the Gen 2 charger happy.

There is no voltage difference between the car body and the grounded conduit when the car is charging; this passed inspection; neither the outlet, circuit breaker, or capped off old dryer receptacle get hot while charging; and it's going to be the aluminum wiring on half of my 110 circuits that's going to burn down my house (or the Li-ion battery in my $8 drone), not the Tesla; so I'm satisfied that this is safe for charging purposes.
You, sir, are a steely eyed voltage man. Salute!
 

Oyster Bait

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#12
I was directed to this some time ago, then tried to find it and couldn't, then recently found it in my wishlist, and bought it while it was found:

Amazon product
Note that it has a suffix "A" similar version with the same specifications. I went to the vendor's website and couldn't find a sensible difference.

I don't recommend it, nor do I not recommend it.
 

Oyster Bait

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#13
It may be useful to others that the Amazon link
Amazon product
has options for other plug ends that may be of interest. The vendor's website may also be useful.

Caveat emptor.