30 Amp 125/250 outlet

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#1
I visit my parents every week and I noticed they have a 30amp 125/250 outlet.

I typed that into the web and it shows Home Depot sells a plug made for Tesla charging.

Is anyone familiar with this? Which one is recommended and how much charge will it provide?

Thanks as I am new to model 3 and to posting on a forum
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JWardell

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#3
For some reason, Tesla has been sold out of the 10-30 adapter for weeks or months.
10-30 is the slightly older standard for dryer outlets, 14-30 is more likely in modern houses.
You can use a 10-30 to 14-50 adapter *IF* you first turn down your charge current to 24 Amp.
Better yet, if you're sure it's not used for anything else anymore you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
 
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#4
Whoa! That’s over my head. I suppose
For some reason, Tesla has been sold out of the 10-30 adapter for weeks or months.
10-30 is the slightly older standard for dryer outlets, 14-30 is more likely in modern houses.
You can use a 10-30 to 14-50 adapter *IF* you first turn down your charge current to 24 Amp.
Better yet, if you're sure it's not used for anything else anymore you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
Whoa! That’s very descriptive but way over my head!I suppose I should have an electrician look at this.
 
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#5

Thank you. I believe it is the 5th

The 10-30 appears to be sold out. I can try to find it on amazon. Is that the correct one? The image doesn’t show the Product number or name.
 
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#6
you can change it to a 14-30 receptacle and use with Tesla's 14-30 adapter, and no need to think about turning down charge current.
In order to change the existing NEMA 10-30 receptacle to a NEMA 14-30, you will need to add/pull a ground wire or run 10/3 + grnd.

I would also vacuum out the dirt particulates in the receptacle or possibly replacing it with a fresh new one after the power is turned off and verified.

You may consider purchasing a MC 10-30 adapter from quickchargepower.com.
Good-luck!
 
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ADK46

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#7
In order to change the existing NEMA 10-30 receptacle to a NEMA 14-30, you will need to add/pull a ground wire or run 10/3 + grnd. ...
I believe the needed extra wire would normally be a neutral, not a ground. Insulated, white - the difference between a 240V and a 240/120V outlet.

(In older wiring there were some exceptions, where the neutral and ground could be supplied by the same wire - after all, they are connected to the same thing back in the panel. So, the present third wire to the receptacle may be bare, like a ground wire, or white like a neutral. I wonder what these adaptors do with the connection of this potentially ambiguous wire.)
 
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#8
I believe the needed extra wire would normally be a neutral, not a ground. Insulated, white - the difference between a 240V and a 240/120V outlet.

(In older wiring there were some exceptions, where the neutral and ground could be supplied by the same wire - after all, they are connected to the same thing back in the panel. So, the present third wire to the receptacle may be bare, like a ground wire, or white like a neutral. I wonder what these adaptors do with the connection of this potentially ambiguous wire.)
NEMA 10-30 is a hot-hot-neutral plug, no ground. That's why its rated 120/240. I can see why Tesla would want out of the ungrounded adapter game. Too high risk.
 

Dr. J

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#9
NEMA 10-30 is a hot-hot-neutral plug, no ground. That's why its rated 120/240. I can see why Tesla would want out of the ungrounded adapter game. Too high risk.
They still sell that adapter for the Gen 1 charger--I bought one just a week ago. Earlier, I bought a Gen 1 charger to use on road trips (because it will charge at 40 amps on a 14-50 campground outlet); I'm currently using it as my home charger until my garage gets built. I also bought a 25' 10-30 extension cord, which was necessary for my current setup and, it turns out, to charge at my Mom's house. Works great.

@Mitchell, I commend you for being an exemplary son (weekly visits to parents). In case it's not clear: a 30-amp circuit should top out at 24 amps (80% of maximum, a standard for safety). If you use anything other than a Tesla 10-30 adapter, the car won't understand it should limit the charge, so you will need to tell it: 24 amps.
 

JML

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#10
TL;DR: I'm 90% sure all the $60 Home Depot 10-30 to 14-50 charging adapter is doing is tying neutral and ground together. For about $12 you can replace the 10-30 receptacle with a 14-30 and tie the neutral and ground together in the plug. Then it will work with the Tesla 14-30 adapter, and you won't have to worry about adjusting the charger current. I'm not a licensed electrician, and I'm not your licensed electrician. If you are not comfortable replacing an outlet, wait for the 10-30 adapter to come into stock, or spend $60 on the 14-50 adapter from Home Depot/Amazon. If your parents have been looking to downsize, burning down their house might be the shove they need to actually do it.

As mentioned, the 10-30 outlet is hot-hot-neutral, and the 14-30 is hot-hot-neutral-ground with neutral and ground connected together in the breaker panel. The 10-30 adapter from Tesla has mostly been sold out since the day I got an unused 10-30 dryer outlet moved to the garage. At the time I got conflicting reports over whether the 10-30 adapter was discontinued or just sold out. The local Tesla store offered to try and get me one overnighted from another store.

The electrician who installed the outlet decided that I did in fact have both a ground and neutral, so I installed a 14-30 in the garage and bought the 14-30 adapter, which avoided the problem of the 10-30 being sold out. It turned out my ground and neutral were not connected in the panel, so the Gen 2 charger refused to charge and gave me a wiring fault code. I disconnected from the ground the electrician had found, and at the plug jumped the neutral and ground together. That made the Gen 2 charger happy.

There is no voltage difference between the car body and the grounded conduit when the car is charging; this passed inspection; neither the outlet, circuit breaker, or capped off old dryer receptacle get hot while charging; and it's going to be the aluminum wiring on half of my 110 circuits that's going to burn down my house (or the Li-ion battery in my $8 drone), not the Tesla; so I'm satisfied that this is safe for charging purposes.
 

Dr. J

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#11
TL;DR: I'm 90% sure all the $60 Home Depot 10-30 to 14-50 charging adapter is doing is tying neutral and ground together. For about $12 you can replace the 10-30 receptacle with a 14-30 and tie the neutral and ground together in the plug. Then it will work with the Tesla 14-30 adapter, and you won't have to worry about adjusting the charger current. I'm not a licensed electrician, and I'm not your licensed electrician. If you are not comfortable replacing an outlet, wait for the 10-30 adapter to come into stock, or spend $60 on the 14-50 adapter from Home Depot/Amazon. If your parents have been looking to downsize, burning down their house might be the shove they need to actually do it.

As mentioned, the 10-30 outlet is hot-hot-neutral, and the 14-30 is hot-hot-neutral-ground with neutral and ground connected together in the breaker panel. The 10-30 adapter from Tesla has mostly been sold out since the day I got an unused 10-30 dryer outlet moved to the garage. At the time I got conflicting reports over whether the 10-30 adapter was discontinued or just sold out. The local Tesla store offered to try and get me one overnighted from another store.

The electrician who installed the outlet decided that I did in fact have both a ground and neutral, so I installed a 14-30 in the garage and bought the 14-30 adapter, which avoided the problem of the 10-30 being sold out. It turned out my ground and neutral were not connected in the panel, so the Gen 2 charger refused to charge and gave me a wiring fault code. I disconnected from the ground the electrician had found, and at the plug jumped the neutral and ground together. That made the Gen 2 charger happy.

There is no voltage difference between the car body and the grounded conduit when the car is charging; this passed inspection; neither the outlet, circuit breaker, or capped off old dryer receptacle get hot while charging; and it's going to be the aluminum wiring on half of my 110 circuits that's going to burn down my house (or the Li-ion battery in my $8 drone), not the Tesla; so I'm satisfied that this is safe for charging purposes.
You, sir, are a steely eyed voltage man. Salute!
 

Oyster Bait

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#12
I was directed to this some time ago, then tried to find it and couldn't, then recently found it in my wishlist, and bought it while it was found:


Note that it has a suffix "A" similar version with the same specifications. I went to the vendor's website and couldn't find a sensible difference.

I don't recommend it, nor do I not recommend it.
 

Oyster Bait

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#13
It may be useful to others that the Amazon link

has options for other plug ends that may be of interest. The vendor's website may also be useful.

Caveat emptor.